claudiaboleyn:

I just want to love Doctor Who again like I used to. 

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977
12 Quotes
I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.
Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.
Source for image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977

12 Quotes

  1. I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
  2. I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
  3. The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
  4. Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
  5. Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
  6. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
  7. If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
  8. Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
  9. You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
  10. The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
  11. I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
  12. Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.

Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.

Source for image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

  • Men: If Orange is the New Black is so good with representation, why are all the men horrible?
  • Women: They're not all horrible. Bennett's nice. What more do you want?
  • Men: But he's clueless and irresponsible! And that's just ONE guy! How can you give me ONE decent male character in a slew of diverse female characters and call THAT representation?
  • Women:
  • Women:
  • Women:
  • Women:
  • Women:
  • Women:
  • Women: ...must be tough.

clepse:

"i wish i had a british accent"

ah yes, the british accentimage

the singular british accent

(Source: freshmountains, via mrtimh)

escapedgoat:

Pretty much what feminists have to deal with on a daily basis…

escapedgoat:

Pretty much what feminists have to deal with on a daily basis…

ninthdoctorsbutt:

songofages:

read-travel-coffee:

Sometimes I just miss these four so, so much. 

Mickey where are you looking?

he’s looking at me

ninthdoctorsbutt:

songofages:

read-travel-coffee:

Sometimes I just miss these four so, so much. 

Mickey where are you looking?

he’s looking at me

(via starkid-nerdfighter)

Doctor Who tonight


Feeling excited but at the same time fucking terrified

“Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue.”

gayperson:

jamesdeenhateclub:

i think it’s important that myself and other white ppl remember that we can not even begin to truly understand the pain and trauma of what is happening in ferguson, nor can we grasp the anger and sadness black communities experience due to this situation. all we can do is stand in solidarity, listen, and not derail or take the focus away from the true face of racism and white supremacy.

this for real.

(via burdge)

Let me be clear: Unarmed college hopefuls don’t deserve to be shot. Unarmed kids heading to work or trade school don’t deserve to be shot. Unarmed kids floundering aimlessly through life don’t deserve to be shot. Unarmed kids who have been in trouble—even those who have been nothing but trouble—don’t deserve to be shot.

The act of pinning the tragedy of a dead black teen to his potential future success, to his respectability, to his “good”-ness, is done with all the best intentions. But if you read between the lines, aren’t we really saying that had he not been on his way to college, there’d be less to mourn?

That’s dead wrong.